Dec 202016
 

Published on Mar 5, 2014

This video describes our program "Securing Economic Rights for Informal Women Workers" with Gumutindo Coffee Cooperative in Uganda.

Children work in the informal economy in many parts of the world.

They often work as scavengers (collecting recyclables from the streets and dump sites), day laborers, cleaners, construction workers, vendors, in seasonal activities, domestic workers, and in small workshops; and often work under hazardous and exploitative conditions.

It is common for children to work as domestic servants across Latin America and parts of Asia.

Such children are very vulnerable to exploitation: often they are not allowed to take breaks or are required to work long hours; many suffer from a lack of access to education, which can contribute to social isolation and a lack of future opportunity.

UNICEF considers domestic work to be among the lowest status, and reports that most child domestic workers are live-in workers and are under the round-the-clock control of their employers. Some estimates suggest that among girls, domestic work is the most common form of employment.

Total Suffering

The total amount of suffering per year in the natural world is beyond all decent contemplation.

During the minute that it takes me to compose this sentence, thousands of children are being abandoned and with many others are running for their lives, whimpering with fear.

Others are slowly being devoured from within by rasping parasites and diseases, thousands of all kinds are dying of starvation, thirst, and disease spawned in the Landfill.

And yet others are being enslaved and abused.

It must be so. Every time there is plenty, There is poverty.

This very fact will automatically lead to an increase in the urban population and “naturally” will increase the poor population and the “natural” state of starvation and misery continues.

In a universe of social media and selfish genes, blind physical forces and social divisiveness, some people are going to get hurt, other people are going to get lucky, and you won't find any rhyme or reason in it, nor any justice. It is the intent of Green Fire to go beyond luck and create a new and better enviroment for them.

The universe of the Children living on Landfills that we observe has precisely the properties we should expect if there is, at bottom, no recognition, no purpose but survival, nothing but pitiless indifference.

Thank you for reading. Don’t be indifferent to this problem, do something, Please!


Mike Prettyman,
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation
For more information come to the website

Children of the Landfill Project

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

http://childrenofthelandfill.earth/

Join our active groups on Markethive

Children of the Landfill
Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

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Dec 112016
 

Informal Workers | WIEGO

Informal workers do not receive social protection through work or legal protection through the state. Too often, these workers are unfairly stigmatized as “illegal”, “underground”, “black” or “grey” – but the vast majority are simply trying to earn a living against great odds.

Informal workers may be self-employed in small unregistered enterprises; they may be sub-contracted workers or even work for wages in unprotected jobs. And they can be found in urban or rural settings, and in the richest as well as the poorest countries.

In recent decades, informal employment has persisted or grown, emerging in unexpected places and in new guises. Today, half to three-quarters or more of non-agricultural workers in developing countries earn their living informally.

They work in plain sight…

Street vendors in Mexico City; rickshaw pullers in Kolkata; jeepney drivers in Manila; push-cart vendors in New York city; garbage collectors in Bogotá; roadside barbers in Durban… those who work on the streets or in open areas belong to the more visible occupational groups in the informal economy.

…and out of sight

Some informal workers are less visible – even invisible. Down the crowded lanes are workshops that repair bicycles and motorcycles; recycle scrap metal; make furniture and metal parts; tan leather and stitch shoes; weave, dye, and print cloth; polish gems; sort and sell paper, and plastic waste; and more.

The least visible informal workers, the majority women, sell or produce goods from their homes: they may be garment or food workers, incense-stick or cigarette rollers, paper bag or kite makers.

Then there are those – again usually women – who work in others’ homes. Tens of millions of domestic workers around the globe are among the most vulnerable of all workers.

And informal workers are not confined to developing countries. There are informal garment workers in Toronto; informal embroiderers on the island of Madeira; informal shoemakers in Madrid; and informal assemblers of electronic parts in Leeds.

Other common categories of informal work in both developed and developing countries include contract workers in restaurants/hotels; sub-contracted janitors and security guards; casual day labourers in construction and agriculture; piece-rate workers in sweatshops; and temporary office helpers or off-site data processors. Most workers in all of these categories are informally employed.

But despite great differences …

Working conditions and earnings differ markedly. Even within countries, the informal economy is highly segmented by place of work, sector of the economy, and status in employment and, across these segments, by social group and gender.

…they have one thing in common

Most of the working poor in the informal economy share lack legal and social protection.

WIEGO’s Focus

WIEGO particularly focuses on four groups – domestic workers, home-based workers, street vendors, and waste pickers – because they tend to be among the poorest informal workers and because women tend to be over-represented among them. Read more about these groups.

Informal Workers | WIEGO.

Source: Informal Workers | WIEGO

Mike Prettyman,
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation
For more information come to the website

Children of the Landfill Project

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

Join our active groups on Markethive

Children of the Landfill
Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

Dec 082016
 

Informal workers do not receive social protection through work or legal protection through the state. Too often, these workers are unfairly stigmatized as “illegal”, “underground”, “black” or “grey” – but the vast majority are simply trying to earn a living against great odds.

Informal workers may be self-employed in small unregistered enterprises; they may be sub-contracted workers or even work for wages in unprotected jobs. And they can be found in urban or rural settings, and in the richest as well as the poorest countries.

In recent decades, informal employment has persisted or grown, emerging in unexpected places and in new guises. Today, half to three-quarters or more of non-agricultural workers in developing countries earn their living informally.

 

 

Mar 302016
 

New research released today – ahead of International Waste Pickers’ Day on March 1 – highlights the role and impact of those who make a living from what others throw away. The study challenges the common view that waste pickers have no place in modern solid waste management systems.

Women in Informal Employment  - Globalizing and Organizing
Waste pickers are among the most invisible workers in the informal economy and often work in deplorable conditions. The study shows how waste pickers in five developing countries play a role in keeping cities clean and highlights the challenges they face in recovering recyclable materials.

In cities where local governments have provided better access to recyclables, integrated waste pickers into formal solid waste management systems and provided protected spaces for sorting and baling waste, waste pickers have report higher earnings, improved door-to-door waste removal services, savings to municipal coffers and reduction in on-the-job health issues.

However, waste pickers in all five study cities – Belo Horizonte, Brazil; Bogota, Colombia; Pune, India; Nakuru, Kenya; and Durban, South Africa – reported significant challenges. Study respondents experienced increased competition from other waste pickers, a reduction in prices for recyclables, and stigmatization and harassment.

These challenges impact family well-being in countries where waste picking is the only work option for many poor people. In Pune, India, for example, waste picking is the main source of household income for 85 per cent of waste pickers’ households. Only 25 per cent of respondents reported having another work activity, indicating the relevance of waste picking as a main source of income.

With the exception of Durban, none of the cities reported formal wage employment as their primary household earnings. Households in some cities received additional income from government grants, illustrating the need for a cushion to fall back on in times of instability.

“Waste pickers are closely linked to local governments and to the urban economy,” says Sonia Dias, Waste Picker Sector Specialist of Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO), who co-authored the study with Melanie Samson, WIEGO’s Africa Waste Sector Specialist. “Formally integrating waste pickers into the solid waste management system makes sense because, in many cities, these workers are the ones who are already providing the only collection of household refuse.”

The study findings imply that policymakers should devise better programmes to reduce vulnerability in workers’ lives, create opportunities to integrate waste pickers into formal systems, and effectively protect basic rights to pursue waste as a livelihood. It also recommends that cities address the vulnerabilities of waste pickers and the households that depend on their earnings by:
Considering the technical capacities and capabilities of waste pickers in solid waste services to support productivity in the informal economy;

  • Developing a system whereby waste pickers are allowed access to recyclables;
  • Providing infrastructure to conduct recycling activities;
  • Carrying out educational campaigns to change stigmas against informal workers; and
  • Working with waste picker organizations to identify a holistic approach to formalization, including offering capacity training and management courses to improve waste pickers’ skills.

About the Study: The Informal Economy Monitoring Study (IEMS) examines working conditions in the informal economy for home-based workers, street vendors, and waste pickers in 10 cities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. For the waste-related segment of the IEMS, WIEGO, which led the study, collaborated with local partner organizations of informal workers in five cities: Asociación de Recicladores de Bogotá (ARB); Instituto Nenuca de Desenvolvimento Sustentável – INSEA and the waste pickers’ networks Redesol and Cataunidos in Belo Horizonte; Asiye eTafuleni in Durban; the Kenya National Alliance of Street Vendors and Informal Traders (KENASVIT) in Nakuru; and the waste pickers’ union Kagad Kach Patra Kashtakari Panchayat (KKPKP) in Pune. The Waste Picker Sector Report, an executive summary, and additional information can be found at www.wiego.org.

About WIEGO
About WIEGO: Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO) is a global action research-policy network that seeks to improve the status of the working poor, especially women, in the informal economy. It does so by highlighting the informal economy through improved statistics and research; by helping to strengthen member-based organizations of informal workers; and by promoting policy dialogues and processes that include informal workers. Visit www.wiego.org for more information.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/2852953#ixzz44OvsU8Wu

Note: Just in case you may have missed any of my previous blog posts, I post here on one of my active projects. It is a new social network for entrepreneurs, completely free, and very unique. It could be a great thing for your business. It is called MarketHive. Just click —-> HERE <—- to find out more.

If you are interested in participating in this effort to lift these children to inspiration, please join me in the Markethive group “Green Fire”. It is from here that we will start a crowd funding campaign to aid Green Fire in its mission – The Children of the Landfill.

Mar 172016
 
Published on Jul 27, 2015

 This video by WIEGO and partners, Asiye eTafuleni(AeT) in South Africa; HomeNet Thailand; and the Self-Employed Women's Association in India tells the stories of informal workers and the difficulties they face in accessing health services in their respective countries. It also presents some of the solutions that each of these organizations has developed to mitigate against these barriers to access.
If you are interested in learning more on this topic, please read the accompanying post on our blog: http://wiego.org/blog/informal-worker…

 

Note: Just in case you may have missed any of my previous blog posts, I post here on one of my active projects. It is a new social network for entrepreneurs, completely free, and very unique. It could be a great thing for your business. It is called MarketHive. Just click —-> HERE <—- to find out more.

If you are interested in participating in this effort to lift these children to inspiration, please join me in the Markethive group “Green Fire”. It is from here that we will start a crowd funding campaign to aid Green Fire in its mission – The Children of the Landfill.

Mar 172016
 
Published on Jul 27, 2015

 This video by WIEGO and partners, Asiye eTafuleni(AeT) in South Africa; HomeNet Thailand; and the Self-Employed Women's Association in India tells the stories of informal workers and the difficulties they face in accessing health services in their respective countries. It also presents some of the solutions that each of these organizations has developed to mitigate against these barriers to access.
If you are interested in learning more on this topic, please read the accompanying post on our blog: http://wiego.org/blog/informal-worker…

 

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0AhLKJrgCY]

Note: Just in case you may have missed any of my previous blog posts, I post here on one of my active projects. It is a new social network for entrepreneurs, completely free, and very unique. It could be a great thing for your business. It is called MarketHive. Just click —-> HERE <—- to find out more.

If you are interested in participating in this effort to lift these children to inspiration, please join me in the Markethive group “Green Fire”. It is from here that we will start a crowd funding campaign to aid Green Fire in its mission – The Children of the Landfill.

Mar 012016
 

I am not an employee and I can't be.

Entrepreneurism is a state of mind, a way of looking out at the world and constantly watching for opportunities. You attune your mind so you look at every situation and evaluate for its business potential. It is not something you do for eight hours a day but all the time you are awake.

In the real world of work, purpose finding is what leaders do.”

Robert E. Quinn

While waiting for my purpose to come into focus, there were many experiences of success and failure, I was lost in the forest with no tree in sight.

Then came that “ah ha” moment. I was working with an independent stock broker and market maker, an absolutely ruthless man. He was truly remarkable, he was the one that was busted for a multi-billion dollar scam in the Hong Kong banks in the early 90's.

Anyway, one day we got into a heated discussion about business, he got pissed and threw a one liner at me that I have never forgotten, “Are you an employee or are you an entrepreneur?”

I am an Entrepreneur.

I am a person who organizes and manages an enterprise, especially a business, usually with considerable initiative and risk.

If it was easy, everyone would do it.”

Working toward being a successful entrepreneur is a drag; you get a good idea but nobody likes it. Then you have a good idea, start the business and it fails. Now repeat after me. “Good Idea, failed.”

That changed Jan 15, 2015, when Tom had the first public meeting of Markethive. On Jan 18th I published my first article on Markethive.

Beginning to understand, I again searched for an entrepreneurial pursuit. “Follow your passion”, “do what you like to do”…

What? … What? What is my passion? Its complicated.

Then there was a sign (you always get one if you listen). I read an article about Zhang Yin.

Zhang Yin, the low-profile mother of two, went from humble beginnings in China to a top ranking position on the list of the world's richest people. In fact, Forbes ranked the owner and founder of Nine Dragons Paper as the wealthiest self-made woman in the world.

She did it with waste, our waste.

In 1985, Zhang moved to Hong Kong and started her first waste paper trading company with just a few thousand dollars. Despite financial difficulties and unscrupulous business partners, Zhang managed to build her wealth. Five years later, she and her husband left for the United States.

In America, the enterprise that would become Nine Dragons was born. Because there was a shortage of paper materials in China and her paper trading business was not doing as well as Zhang would have liked, she left for America. In the U.S., however, she had no such problem. There was plenty of waste paper everywhere she and her husband looked.

Zhang set up a system to collect and bundle the paper in America, then send it to China to be processed into usable paper products. American raw “waste” materials were shipped across the Pacific for processing. Our paper waste was converted into boxes, cardboard, and other paper products, then sold to Chinese manufacturers as packaging and containers and then sold back to us full of Chinese products.

With an estimated net worth of more than $3.4 billion, Zhang Yin has more money than both Oprah Winfrey and "Harry Potter" creator J.K. Rowling. In schools, Zhang is lauded as an example to young Chinese girls of their unlimited potential and ability.

She did it with waste.

Waste has value.

From a certain point of view, it is the very bottom of the material wealth of society. What society wastes and considers unusable and worthless.

Well its not worthless and I claim it!

Here is the deal,we have 7 billion people in the world and each of them wastes an average of 100 tons in a lifetime. 40% of all waste goes into open landfills. These landfills directly affect half of the world's population.

Is there an opportunity here?

Green Fire is the only company in the world that can do what is needed for this situation.

We have a simple model, we call it the Triangle of Waste; raw materials into commodities, commodities into Waste, Waste into raw materials. Green Fire turns waste into raw reusable materials.

I found an entrepreneurial opportunity in waste and a purpose that inspired the business of landfill mining and what we are able to give back to society in the process.

There are several global organizations that focus on this opportunity. Let me introduce you.

Wiego – Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing

WIEGO is a global network focused on securing livelihoods for the working poor, especially women, in the informal economy.

Informal workers need voice, visibility and validity. WIEGO creates change by building capacity among informal worker organizations, expanding the knowledge base, and influencing local, national and international policies.

Today WIEGO is a thriving network of 176 Individual and Institutional Members in 40 countries who share this concern.

The Global Alliance of Waste Pickers

The Global Alliance of Waste Pickers is a networking process supported by WIEGO, among thousands of waste picker organizations with groups in more than 28 countries covering mainly Latin America, Asia and Africa.

Waste pickers are workers in the informal economy who represent, according to several institutions (ILO, World Bank, and others), 1% of the urban population. They total approximately 15 million landfill pickers in 96 regional organizations.

ISWA – The International Solid Wast Association

The National Members are non-profit, waste management associations representing the waste management industry in a particular country. Generally, these associations have memberships from both the private and public sector. Based on ISWA regulations, the National Members are the only memberships allowed to vote at the General Assembly and thus, they constitute the governing body of ISWA. ISWA's global waste management network adds up to over 100,000 waste management professionals associated with ISWA National Member organizations alone.

Membership in ISWA is paid, not so in the other two

Inspiration after inspiration.

We are Landfill Miners and more.

GF re-purposes the reclaimed raw materials into usable material then uses that to create small autonomous villages for the workers (Pickers) that live and work on these landfills.

My business is waste and I am a founding member of Green Fire Engineered Reclamation, the only company in the world that can reclaim and reuse 99% of all landfill wastes.

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation is an Engineering company, not environmental, not mining and not geological but a combined association of those professionals with an intent toward landfill mining.

The people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones who do.
Steve Jobs

Green Fire is going to change the world.

Note: Just in case you may have missed any of my previous blog posts, here is one of my active projects. It is a new social network for entrepreneurs, completely free, and very unique. It could be a great thing for your business. It is called MarketHive. Just click —-> HERE <—- to find out more.