Apr 252017
 

Greenfire brings ways to clean the pullotants out of these landfills for the benefit of these acavengers. Thier nomadic lives have found a continuation of the poor lifestyle. Greenfire can turn the poverty into prosparity.  http://greenfirefunding.com/ 

Sanitation workers and scavengers pick their way through the refuse of the landfill in the Payatas district of Quezon City, Metro Manila. (Photo by Akira Kodaka)

MANILA — What is it like living at the foot of a mountain of garbage?

The Payatas district in Quezon City, Metro Manila, has been called the city's "second Smokey Mountain" — a huge mound of refuse from which many scavengers scrape out a meager income.

Payatas is about a 40-minute drive from central Manila. There, on a spring day, a long column of garbage-laden trucks heads for the dump, billowing up dust. A foul smell is on the breeze.

A nearby hill gives a bird's-eye view of the dump. With a long camera lens one can get a clear look at the top of the massive garbage heap. As the trucks unload, sanitation workers and scavengers scramble.

The scavengers eke out a living collecting and selling metal and plastic scrap to dealers. In the Payatas district, they earn between 100 pesos and 300 pesos ($2 to $6) a day. It is less than the minimum wage, but better than nothing.

Smokey Mountain was the nickname of a large, smoldering landfill located in Manila's Tondo district. After it was shut down in 1995, many of the scavengers who lived there moved to Payatas. The community that arose became known as the second Smokey Mountain, though on this day there was no smoke visible.

Order amid chaos

The Quezon municipal government manages the Payatas landfill. There is a checkpoint at the entrance, through which only registered waste disposal workers and scavengers are allowed to enter.

The scavengers are divided into two groups of 400-500 people each, with the first group allowed to enter in the morning and the second in the afternoon. The dump is supposed to be off limits to children 15 years old or younger.

The entry restrictions were introduced in response to a landslide at the dump in 2000 that left about 300 people dead or missing.

 

 

But the landfill is expected to reach its capacity in a year or two. It is anyone's guess what will become of the community then.

These days, recycling garbage is not the only business in the area. Some people are making handicrafts such as stuffed animals with the help of a nonprofit organization, for example.

The Philippine economy continues to grow, but it will take time for the fruits of development to spread to impoverished areas like Payatas. People living at the foot of the garbage mountain will no doubt keep getting by as best they can, hoping for something better.

Source: Payatas scavengers living on Manila’s waste

Apr 112017
 

Land Department and MPKj officers visiting the former forest reserve of Bukit Enggang in Bandar Sungai Long. The site is being used to illegally dump rubbish and carry out open burning activities. — SAMUEL ONG/The Star

Land Department and MPKj officers visiting the former forest reserve of Bukit Enggang in Bandar Sungai Long. The site is being used to illegally dump rubbish and carry out open burning activities. — SAMUEL ONG/The Star

ILLEGAL rubbish dumping and open burning at the former forest reserve of Bukit Enggang in Bandar Sungai Long are posing serious health problems for residents.

Over the past 10 years, there have been about 10 illegal rubbish dumps in Bukit Enggang. The residents claimed this had made them fall sick and their children were coughing badly after inhaling smoke from the open burning.

The illegal dumping problem has not been resolved despite residents’ many complaints and actions by the Kajang Municipal Council (MPKj).

Sungai Long resident Yong Yew Hong, 53, who lived there for more than three years, said he jogged in Bukit Enggang every day.

“At midnight every day a few rubbish and sand trucks filled with rubbish enter Bukit Enggang and come out empty,” said Yong when visiting the rubbish dump at Bukit Enggang.

“There are about 10 rubbish dumps in the housing areas near Bukit Enggang where residents suffer from the foul smell and smoke from the burning of rubbish.

“They start burning the rubbish in the evening every day. This causes the air in the housing area to be hazy.

Another Sungai Long resident Lee Hui Leng, 34, said they were forced to close their windows and doors to keep the smoke out.

“When my husband and I drove past the area one night, we noticed the people burning the rubbish with kerosene,” said Lee.

Jogger Benny Ong, 74, said he had been exercising and jogging at Bukit Enggang for about 20 years.

“Now Bukit Enggang is famous for illegal dumping. The foul smell and smoke from the rubbish dumps have kept joggers away.

“There are food waste, broken furniture, development waste and many more at the rubbish dumps,” said Ong.

Kajang Municipal councillor Lai Wai Chong said MPKj received 52 complaints from the residents in February and confiscated 12 vehicles.

“Each offender was fined RM2,000 and their vehicles confiscated for a month.

“We will return the vehicles to the offenders only after they pay up the fine,” he said, adding that the council would keep a 24-hour watch over the area to catch the culprits red-handed.

Source: Open burning at illegal rubbish dumps a health risk for Bukit Enggang folk – Community | The Star Online

Apr 032017
 

INDONESIA: The Methane Gas Canteen is an eatery like no other – it’s situated right in the middle of the Jatibarang Landfill in Semarang, Central Java, surrounded by mounds of putrefying waste, household rubbish, broken glass and plastic.

Every day, while men, women and children dig through mountains of trash collecting plastic and glass bottles to sell, husband and wife team Sarimin and Suyatmi are busy cooking.

Their customers? Cash-strapped scavengers who have the option to pay for their meals with plastic waste instead of money – part of the community’s novel solution to recycle the non-degradable plastic and reduce waste in the landfill.

Mr Sarimin, 56, weighs the amount of plastic each customer brings to the diner and calculates how much it is worth. This value is then deducted from the cost of the meal, or any surplus value refunded to the customer.

“I think we recycle 1 tonne of plastic waste a day, which is a lot. This way, the plastic waste doesn’t pile up, drift down the river and cause flooding.

“This doesn’t only benefit the scavengers, it benefits everyone,” said Mr Sarimin.

WATCH: How this works (2:08)

 

 

 

 

Source: Diner in the landfill lets patrons pay for lunch with plastic waste – Channel NewsAsia

Mar 272017
 

Playing For Change has demonstrated what I believe is one of the most viable social mechanisms of all, music as a bridge for a common connection between all people.

This principle of “applied music” is successful with the invisible children of the world. I first witnessed its success through a youtube video, “Landfill Harmonic”. In this instance music gave a complete life transformation to the “Children of the Landfill” when they were taught to not only play but to build their own instruments for the waste in the landfill.

There is an estimated 15 million* children “living to survive” on the world’s open landfills and dumps. Green Fire Engineered Reclamation is a Landfill Mining company and has designed for the “Children of the Landfill” a lifestyle transformation that includes music as one of the basics to aid the transition into society

* Source of information The Independent

HISTORY, MISSION, AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES OF THE PLAYING FOR CHANGE FOUNDATION

Playing For Change arose from a common belief that music has the power to connect people regardless of their differences. In 2005, a small group of filmmakers set out with a dream to create a film rooted in the music of the streets. Not only has that dream been realized, it has grown into a global sensation that has touched the lives of millions of people around the world…

When the crew set out, they created a mobile recording studio and went around the world filming musicians in the places where they lived. The sound was then mixed, and although the musicians were never in the same room—or even the same country or continent—they were unified through music with each contributing her or his distinct gifts to the whole. While traveling the world to film and record, the crew got to know the music and people of each community they visited. Those involved wanted to give something back to the musicians who had shared so much with them.

In 2007, the Playing for Change Foundation was established as a 501(c)3 non-profit organization created to inspire, connect, and bring peace to the world through music. Our mission is to create positive change through music and arts education. As one of our students in Nepal stated, “Music is an indispensable part of life -‐ you cannot live without music.” We couldn’t agree more. At the Playing For Change Foundation, we live our lives by this principle and apply it to everything we do.

https://playingforchange.org/

Mar 252017
 

Good Day Friends, There are now several thousands of subscribers to my newsletter, Inside GreenFire DAO. A news letter that follows the development of an Industrial blockchain application for landfill mining and landfill Commerce for the "Children of the Landfill", those that are forced by circumstances to "live to survive" on the world's dumps.

The security of my subscribers has been threatened, who would of thought that a newsletter about the world's waste would get such a reaction.
 
That said, I have moved my newsletter hosting to the secure cloud hosting of Markethive, a global inbound social marketing system equipped for serious client security and protection. Follow the link below, click on the facebook icon, say yes and become a member of "Inside GreenFire DAO" group and get a free inbound marketing account to use for your business. Take a quick look, see what is so disturbing and then follow along it does have its advantages. You will get a free cryptocurrency wallet as a member.

The page below has a short but informative video about the blockchain and the company we are working with, Infinity-economics. PLEASE JOIN Inside GreenFire DAO Newsletter Join and keep informed on this blockchain development, the pre-ICO and the ICO. If you know why the topic of waste and the reclamation of global waste is resisted so strongly, please advise me. Thank you

Dec 272016
 
 
Indore Municipal Corporation Issues Occupational Identity Cards to Wastepickers

Written by Kabir Arora. Waste Narratives. 12/15/2016



Indore Municipal Corporation issued occupational identity cards to 25o wastepickers associated with Jan Vikas Society. The cards were distributed by Ms. Malini Gaur, Mayor of Indore city in the presence of many officials from the corporation. The identity card  s are c0-signed by Chief Medical Officer and Director, Jan Vikas Society. With that Indore becomes the first city in Madhya Pradesh to undertake  such an inclusionary measure.

The issuance of identity cards is an outcome of a long struggle waded by waste-pickers in the city. It has also been mandated by Solid Waste Management Rules, 2016 and Swachh Bharat Abhiyaan guidelines. Commissioner of the city has assured that all wastepickers wi  ll be enumerated and given identity cards.

There are more than 3000 wastepickers in Indore, 93 percent of them are women. Jan Vikas Society has been working with wastepickers for the  past 15 years through formation of cooperative society, self help groups and providing vocational training, conducting regular health check-ups etc.

>Efforts are on to get waste pickers integrated into  the solid waste management process of Indore Municipal Corporation. 


 


 

Dec 272016
 

Massive fire contained but hotspots remain at landfill

 

Originally Uploaded on Jul 18, 2008

 

In countries around the world, hundreds of thousands of poor people face daily hazards to earn meager livings by scavenging for recyclable goods. In Cambodia, hundreds of scavenger families find their lives changing – they will lose their homes and livelihoods when the government closes the dump where they work. Rory Byrne has this report from Phnom Penh. Officially, it is the Steung Meanchey landfill site, but those who live here call it Smokey Mountain. Steung Meanchey dump is a seven-hectare mountain of smoking garbage on the outskirts of the Cambodian capital Phnom Penh. Here some 2,000 workers, including about 600 children, sift through 700 tons of garbage a day.

In developing countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, garbage scavengers are among the poorest workers. In Cambodia, they typically earn about one dollar a day. Ten-year-old Ya has been recycling bottles and cans at the dump for three years. He says the situation here is terrible. He has to get up very early to work and finishes late in the evening. Ya says his life is very difficult. Collecting garbage brings him less than $1 a day which is not nearly enough to cover his expenses. Most of the scavengers live in wooden shacks around the dump. There is no access to clean water or sanitation and epidemics are commonplace.

The risks here are high. Sharp-edged metals and broken glass leave nasty wounds. And garbage scavengers suffer high rates of serious diseases, such as hepatitis, tuberculosis and even AIDS. A number of scavengers have been killed or seriously injured when they were run over by garbage trucks. She says it is very dangerous to work here – people can step on metal shards or nails for example or get hit and crushed by the dump trucks. She says she has injured herself with many things, like old needles.

Annette Jensen is the director of A New Day, a charity that provides free food, shelter and schooling to more than 100 children from Steung Meanchey dump.

"To see the children miserable, dirty, sad looking at the garbage dump and then have them arrive with their little plastic bag with all their belongings and move into the center. And to see their excitement about taking a shower. To see their excitement about getting their little bag of shampoo. And to see them clean, putting on their school uniform and going to school has just been amazing," says Jensen. But most of those working on Cambodia's landfills are not so lucky, and for children like Ya, going to school remains a distant dream,

Ya has he would go to school if he could stop working at the dump. He says he wants to go to school but cannot because his family is so poor.

Ya and his family now face a new challenge: the government plans to close Steung Meanchey and relocate the 535 families living there to land about 50 kilometers south of Phnom Penh.

The government will let them have tiny plots on which to build new homes. An official in charge of the project notes the location is near Udong Mountain, a tourist site, so that there are jobs available in the region. And he says, families are not being forced to move, but most are volunteering.

Still, no families have left so far. Many scavengers say they will be happy to leave the dump, but they are worried that they will not be able to make a living because the relocation camp is too far away from the city. By Rory Byrne, Phnom Penh.

Mike Prettyman,
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation
For more information come to the website

Children of the Landfill Project

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

Join our active groups on Markethive

Children of the Landfill
Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

 

Dec 232016
 

Cambodia: CHILDREN OF THE DUMP

via Cambodia: CHILDREN OF THE DUMP – YouTube.

Uploaded on Jul 18, 2008

In countries around the world, hundreds of thousands of poor people face daily hazards to earn meager livings by scavenging for recyclable goods. In Cambodia, hundreds of scavenger families find their lives changing – they will lose their homes and livelihoods when the government closes the dump where they work. Rory Byrne has this report from Phnom Penh. Officially, it is the Steung Meanchey landfill site, but those who live here call it Smokey Mountain. Steung Meanchey dump is a seven-hectare mountain of smoking garbage on the outskirts of the Cambodian capital Phnom Penh. Here some 2,000 workers, including about 600 children, sift through 700 tons of garbage a day.

In developing countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, garbage scavengers are among the poorest workers. In Cambodia, they typically earn about one dollar a day. Ten-year-old Ya has been recycling bottles and cans at the dump for three years. He says the situation here is terrible. He has to get up very early to work and finishes late in the evening. Ya says his life is very difficult. Collecting garbage brings him less than $1 a day which is not nearly enough to cover his expenses. Most of the scavengers live in wooden shacks around the dump. There is no access to clean water or sanitation and epidemics are commonplace.

The risks here are high. Sharp-edged metals and broken glass leave nasty wounds. And garbage scavengers suffer high rates of serious diseases, such as hepatitis, tuberculosis and even AIDS. A number of scavengers have been killed or seriously injured when they were run over by garbage trucks. She says it is very dangerous to work here – people can step on metal shards or nails for example or get hit and crushed by the dump trucks. She says she has injured herself with many things, like old needles.

Annette Jensen is the director of A New Day, a charity that provides free food, shelter and schooling to more than 100 children from Steung Meanchey dump.

"To see the children miserable, dirty, sad looking at the garbage dump and then have them arrive with their little plastic bag with all their belongings and move into the center. And to see their excitement about taking a shower. To see their excitement about getting their little bag of shampoo. And to see them clean, putting on their school uniform and going to school has just been amazing," says Jensen. But most of those working on Cambodia's landfills are not so lucky, and for children like Ya, going to school remains a distant dream,

Ya has he would go to school if he could stop working at the dump. He says he wants to go to school but cannot because his family is so poor.

Ya and his family now face a new challenge: the government plans to close Steung Meanchey and relocate the 535 families living there to land about 50 kilometers south of Phnom Penh.

The government will let them have tiny plots on which to build new homes. An official in charge of the project notes the location is near Udong Mountain, a tourist site, so that there are jobs available in the region. And he says, families are not being forced to move, but most are volunteering.

Still, no families have left so far. Many scavengers say they will be happy to leave the dump, but they are worried that they will not be able to make a living because the relocation camp is too far away from the city. By Rory Byrne, Phnom Penh.

Source: Cambodia: CHILDREN OF THE DUMP – YouTube

Dec 202016
 

Published on Mar 5, 2014

This video describes our program "Securing Economic Rights for Informal Women Workers" with Gumutindo Coffee Cooperative in Uganda.

Children work in the informal economy in many parts of the world.

They often work as scavengers (collecting recyclables from the streets and dump sites), day laborers, cleaners, construction workers, vendors, in seasonal activities, domestic workers, and in small workshops; and often work under hazardous and exploitative conditions.

It is common for children to work as domestic servants across Latin America and parts of Asia.

Such children are very vulnerable to exploitation: often they are not allowed to take breaks or are required to work long hours; many suffer from a lack of access to education, which can contribute to social isolation and a lack of future opportunity.

UNICEF considers domestic work to be among the lowest status, and reports that most child domestic workers are live-in workers and are under the round-the-clock control of their employers. Some estimates suggest that among girls, domestic work is the most common form of employment.

Total Suffering

The total amount of suffering per year in the natural world is beyond all decent contemplation.

During the minute that it takes me to compose this sentence, thousands of children are being abandoned and with many others are running for their lives, whimpering with fear.

Others are slowly being devoured from within by rasping parasites and diseases, thousands of all kinds are dying of starvation, thirst, and disease spawned in the Landfill.

And yet others are being enslaved and abused.

It must be so. Every time there is plenty, There is poverty.

This very fact will automatically lead to an increase in the urban population and “naturally” will increase the poor population and the “natural” state of starvation and misery continues.

In a universe of social media and selfish genes, blind physical forces and social divisiveness, some people are going to get hurt, other people are going to get lucky, and you won't find any rhyme or reason in it, nor any justice. It is the intent of Green Fire to go beyond luck and create a new and better enviroment for them.

The universe of the Children living on Landfills that we observe has precisely the properties we should expect if there is, at bottom, no recognition, no purpose but survival, nothing but pitiless indifference.

Thank you for reading. Don’t be indifferent to this problem, do something, Please!


Mike Prettyman,
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation
For more information come to the website

Children of the Landfill Project

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

http://childrenofthelandfill.earth/

Join our active groups on Markethive

Children of the Landfill
Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

Join the Facebook Group, Children of the Landfill

Donations are taken in Bitcoin: 1HBUKMz77xtRh1vNzFAtnJ488NoYde15o5


 

 
Dec 112016
 

Informal Workers | WIEGO

Informal workers do not receive social protection through work or legal protection through the state. Too often, these workers are unfairly stigmatized as “illegal”, “underground”, “black” or “grey” – but the vast majority are simply trying to earn a living against great odds.

Informal workers may be self-employed in small unregistered enterprises; they may be sub-contracted workers or even work for wages in unprotected jobs. And they can be found in urban or rural settings, and in the richest as well as the poorest countries.

In recent decades, informal employment has persisted or grown, emerging in unexpected places and in new guises. Today, half to three-quarters or more of non-agricultural workers in developing countries earn their living informally.

They work in plain sight…

Street vendors in Mexico City; rickshaw pullers in Kolkata; jeepney drivers in Manila; push-cart vendors in New York city; garbage collectors in Bogotá; roadside barbers in Durban… those who work on the streets or in open areas belong to the more visible occupational groups in the informal economy.

…and out of sight

Some informal workers are less visible – even invisible. Down the crowded lanes are workshops that repair bicycles and motorcycles; recycle scrap metal; make furniture and metal parts; tan leather and stitch shoes; weave, dye, and print cloth; polish gems; sort and sell paper, and plastic waste; and more.

The least visible informal workers, the majority women, sell or produce goods from their homes: they may be garment or food workers, incense-stick or cigarette rollers, paper bag or kite makers.

Then there are those – again usually women – who work in others’ homes. Tens of millions of domestic workers around the globe are among the most vulnerable of all workers.

And informal workers are not confined to developing countries. There are informal garment workers in Toronto; informal embroiderers on the island of Madeira; informal shoemakers in Madrid; and informal assemblers of electronic parts in Leeds.

Other common categories of informal work in both developed and developing countries include contract workers in restaurants/hotels; sub-contracted janitors and security guards; casual day labourers in construction and agriculture; piece-rate workers in sweatshops; and temporary office helpers or off-site data processors. Most workers in all of these categories are informally employed.

But despite great differences …

Working conditions and earnings differ markedly. Even within countries, the informal economy is highly segmented by place of work, sector of the economy, and status in employment and, across these segments, by social group and gender.

…they have one thing in common

Most of the working poor in the informal economy share lack legal and social protection.

WIEGO’s Focus

WIEGO particularly focuses on four groups – domestic workers, home-based workers, street vendors, and waste pickers – because they tend to be among the poorest informal workers and because women tend to be over-represented among them. Read more about these groups.

Informal Workers | WIEGO.

Source: Informal Workers | WIEGO

Mike Prettyman,
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation
For more information come to the website

Children of the Landfill Project

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

Join our active groups on Markethive

Children of the Landfill
Green Fire Engineered Reclamation