Apr 252017
 

Greenfire brings ways to clean the pullotants out of these landfills for the benefit of these acavengers. Thier nomadic lives have found a continuation of the poor lifestyle. Greenfire can turn the poverty into prosparity.  http://greenfirefunding.com/ 

Sanitation workers and scavengers pick their way through the refuse of the landfill in the Payatas district of Quezon City, Metro Manila. (Photo by Akira Kodaka)

MANILA — What is it like living at the foot of a mountain of garbage?

The Payatas district in Quezon City, Metro Manila, has been called the city's "second Smokey Mountain" — a huge mound of refuse from which many scavengers scrape out a meager income.

Payatas is about a 40-minute drive from central Manila. There, on a spring day, a long column of garbage-laden trucks heads for the dump, billowing up dust. A foul smell is on the breeze.

A nearby hill gives a bird's-eye view of the dump. With a long camera lens one can get a clear look at the top of the massive garbage heap. As the trucks unload, sanitation workers and scavengers scramble.

The scavengers eke out a living collecting and selling metal and plastic scrap to dealers. In the Payatas district, they earn between 100 pesos and 300 pesos ($2 to $6) a day. It is less than the minimum wage, but better than nothing.

Smokey Mountain was the nickname of a large, smoldering landfill located in Manila's Tondo district. After it was shut down in 1995, many of the scavengers who lived there moved to Payatas. The community that arose became known as the second Smokey Mountain, though on this day there was no smoke visible.

Order amid chaos

The Quezon municipal government manages the Payatas landfill. There is a checkpoint at the entrance, through which only registered waste disposal workers and scavengers are allowed to enter.

The scavengers are divided into two groups of 400-500 people each, with the first group allowed to enter in the morning and the second in the afternoon. The dump is supposed to be off limits to children 15 years old or younger.

The entry restrictions were introduced in response to a landslide at the dump in 2000 that left about 300 people dead or missing.

 

 

But the landfill is expected to reach its capacity in a year or two. It is anyone's guess what will become of the community then.

These days, recycling garbage is not the only business in the area. Some people are making handicrafts such as stuffed animals with the help of a nonprofit organization, for example.

The Philippine economy continues to grow, but it will take time for the fruits of development to spread to impoverished areas like Payatas. People living at the foot of the garbage mountain will no doubt keep getting by as best they can, hoping for something better.

Source: Payatas scavengers living on Manila’s waste

Apr 032017
 

INDONESIA: The Methane Gas Canteen is an eatery like no other – it’s situated right in the middle of the Jatibarang Landfill in Semarang, Central Java, surrounded by mounds of putrefying waste, household rubbish, broken glass and plastic.

Every day, while men, women and children dig through mountains of trash collecting plastic and glass bottles to sell, husband and wife team Sarimin and Suyatmi are busy cooking.

Their customers? Cash-strapped scavengers who have the option to pay for their meals with plastic waste instead of money – part of the community’s novel solution to recycle the non-degradable plastic and reduce waste in the landfill.

Mr Sarimin, 56, weighs the amount of plastic each customer brings to the diner and calculates how much it is worth. This value is then deducted from the cost of the meal, or any surplus value refunded to the customer.

“I think we recycle 1 tonne of plastic waste a day, which is a lot. This way, the plastic waste doesn’t pile up, drift down the river and cause flooding.

“This doesn’t only benefit the scavengers, it benefits everyone,” said Mr Sarimin.

WATCH: How this works (2:08)

 

 

 

 

Source: Diner in the landfill lets patrons pay for lunch with plastic waste – Channel NewsAsia

Mar 252017
 

Good Day Friends, There are now several thousands of subscribers to my newsletter, Inside GreenFire DAO. A news letter that follows the development of an Industrial blockchain application for landfill mining and landfill Commerce for the "Children of the Landfill", those that are forced by circumstances to "live to survive" on the world's dumps.

The security of my subscribers has been threatened, who would of thought that a newsletter about the world's waste would get such a reaction.
 
That said, I have moved my newsletter hosting to the secure cloud hosting of Markethive, a global inbound social marketing system equipped for serious client security and protection. Follow the link below, click on the facebook icon, say yes and become a member of "Inside GreenFire DAO" group and get a free inbound marketing account to use for your business. Take a quick look, see what is so disturbing and then follow along it does have its advantages. You will get a free cryptocurrency wallet as a member.

The page below has a short but informative video about the blockchain and the company we are working with, Infinity-economics. PLEASE JOIN Inside GreenFire DAO Newsletter Join and keep informed on this blockchain development, the pre-ICO and the ICO. If you know why the topic of waste and the reclamation of global waste is resisted so strongly, please advise me. Thank you

Mar 022017
 

This story depicts the conditions of global waste, the most dangerous invisible threat to mankind that exists.

Millions can be lifted out of poverty without ruining the planet with the help of clean sustainable energy.

Practical Action (formerly ITDG),

Power to the People, 2002



What Is It About Waste?

Is It Waste Or Is It Waste?

Waste, Just look at it. It’s the stuff we put in the little plastic bag lining the kitchen “garbage can”, then take to the big black garbage can container out at the curb. Listen, subconsciously for the sound of the garbage truck then again subconsciously sigh when we hear the dumping and the truck driving to the next garbage container.

Most of the people fail to see it at all – the eye tends to subtract it – but those who do notice usually don’t pay any attention. It’s “Out sight out of mind.”

According to the United Nation. ‘Wastes’ are substance or objects, which are disposed of or are intended to be disposed of or are required to be disposed of by the provisions of national law.

In the modern language of garbage “Waste”, has become synonymous with “Trash” – that is, waste has come to mean the perceived dirty, icky, unhelpful, useless, valueless material that’s left over when we’re done with something. By this definition, waste is the foul stuff we wish would just disappear.

Out of Sight, Out of Mind”

Our entire elaborate waste collection, transportation and disposal system has for a century been built around this “just make it go away” concept, An illusion for which Americans happily (or at least regularly) pay either through taxes or monthly bills. Waste in this sort of discussion is always to be defined as a cost, a negative and a burden – an inevitable, unpleasant fact of life, for which the only remedy is removal.

I apply a different definition to the word “Waste”, the one we at Green Fire emphasize – the original verb form of the word as in ‘to waste” something. By this definition the nature of the discussion changes, because “to waste” implies the object being wasted has value, be it time, resources or manpower. After all, you can’t “Waste” something that has no value.

The intro to WALL-E displays an image of a post-apocalyptic Earth. An image that in today’s world grows millions of tons every day. An image of the Earth that may be. An image of the earth we wasted.

Description from the trailer:

The intro to WALL-E combines an image of a post-apocalyptic Earth with the post-war vocals of “Hello Dolly.” It connects the post-apocalypse to the aesthetics of the 50s (“Hello Dolly” is actually from the 60s, but still), the period both of the birth of consumer society and of nuclear paranoia, an image reinforced by the subsequent 50s stylings of the Buy ‘n’ Large outlets we see a bit later. I’m intrigued as to why this is the style we still reach to, 60 or so years later, when we want to represent the end of the world.

Wall-E trailer

What follows is not a cartoon, it is today’s reality.

The many posts will introduce you to the world’s waste conditions based on the projections of global organizations and the major organizations envolved and their efforts in this cause.

There is a growing awareness of the fact that surrounding every major population center in the world is a landfill and that almost 2% of the population of the metro area are informal workers and the Landfill Pickers. There are examples and reports from credible resources that are included about the many similar situations around the world.

The Green Fire Engineered Reclamation vision is outlined addressing the major needs of this situation; clean energy, very low cost housing, employment, education, health and Hope For The Future. Our uses of what is reclaimed is purposely designed to provide a safe healthy environment to these workers.

Please continue. This story is told with images and short videos included.

Feb 172017
 

We are GreenFire DAO, an industrial blockchain application for Landfill Mining & Reclamation and its cryptocurrency, the “Gladiator” (GLD), a gold and asset backed global trade token.

Our solution is the creation of a decentralized autonomous organization, the GreenFire DAO to manage this project.

To fund the GreenFire DAO creation, a crypto token, the “Gladiator” (GLD), is issued and may then freely traded, with its value reflecting the productivity of the GreenFire DAO and the constantly increasing gold and cash backing.

The “Gladiator” Token is available HERE , The Gladiator (GLD) is backed 2:1 with assets on deposit.

If you are interested in participating in the reclamtion of global open dumps and help stop the 20% stream of additional global pollution coming form them, then, please buy a Gladiator Token.

For Friends and visitors – a 15 day 50% discount, Go to http://greenfirefunding.com and purchase with this discount code: insidethedao

Dec 232016
 

Cambodia: CHILDREN OF THE DUMP

via Cambodia: CHILDREN OF THE DUMP – YouTube.

Uploaded on Jul 18, 2008

In countries around the world, hundreds of thousands of poor people face daily hazards to earn meager livings by scavenging for recyclable goods. In Cambodia, hundreds of scavenger families find their lives changing – they will lose their homes and livelihoods when the government closes the dump where they work. Rory Byrne has this report from Phnom Penh. Officially, it is the Steung Meanchey landfill site, but those who live here call it Smokey Mountain. Steung Meanchey dump is a seven-hectare mountain of smoking garbage on the outskirts of the Cambodian capital Phnom Penh. Here some 2,000 workers, including about 600 children, sift through 700 tons of garbage a day.

In developing countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, garbage scavengers are among the poorest workers. In Cambodia, they typically earn about one dollar a day. Ten-year-old Ya has been recycling bottles and cans at the dump for three years. He says the situation here is terrible. He has to get up very early to work and finishes late in the evening. Ya says his life is very difficult. Collecting garbage brings him less than $1 a day which is not nearly enough to cover his expenses. Most of the scavengers live in wooden shacks around the dump. There is no access to clean water or sanitation and epidemics are commonplace.

The risks here are high. Sharp-edged metals and broken glass leave nasty wounds. And garbage scavengers suffer high rates of serious diseases, such as hepatitis, tuberculosis and even AIDS. A number of scavengers have been killed or seriously injured when they were run over by garbage trucks. She says it is very dangerous to work here – people can step on metal shards or nails for example or get hit and crushed by the dump trucks. She says she has injured herself with many things, like old needles.

Annette Jensen is the director of A New Day, a charity that provides free food, shelter and schooling to more than 100 children from Steung Meanchey dump.

"To see the children miserable, dirty, sad looking at the garbage dump and then have them arrive with their little plastic bag with all their belongings and move into the center. And to see their excitement about taking a shower. To see their excitement about getting their little bag of shampoo. And to see them clean, putting on their school uniform and going to school has just been amazing," says Jensen. But most of those working on Cambodia's landfills are not so lucky, and for children like Ya, going to school remains a distant dream,

Ya has he would go to school if he could stop working at the dump. He says he wants to go to school but cannot because his family is so poor.

Ya and his family now face a new challenge: the government plans to close Steung Meanchey and relocate the 535 families living there to land about 50 kilometers south of Phnom Penh.

The government will let them have tiny plots on which to build new homes. An official in charge of the project notes the location is near Udong Mountain, a tourist site, so that there are jobs available in the region. And he says, families are not being forced to move, but most are volunteering.

Still, no families have left so far. Many scavengers say they will be happy to leave the dump, but they are worried that they will not be able to make a living because the relocation camp is too far away from the city. By Rory Byrne, Phnom Penh.

Source: Cambodia: CHILDREN OF THE DUMP – YouTube

Dec 202016
 

Published on Mar 5, 2014

This video describes our program "Securing Economic Rights for Informal Women Workers" with Gumutindo Coffee Cooperative in Uganda.

Children work in the informal economy in many parts of the world.

They often work as scavengers (collecting recyclables from the streets and dump sites), day laborers, cleaners, construction workers, vendors, in seasonal activities, domestic workers, and in small workshops; and often work under hazardous and exploitative conditions.

It is common for children to work as domestic servants across Latin America and parts of Asia.

Such children are very vulnerable to exploitation: often they are not allowed to take breaks or are required to work long hours; many suffer from a lack of access to education, which can contribute to social isolation and a lack of future opportunity.

UNICEF considers domestic work to be among the lowest status, and reports that most child domestic workers are live-in workers and are under the round-the-clock control of their employers. Some estimates suggest that among girls, domestic work is the most common form of employment.

Total Suffering

The total amount of suffering per year in the natural world is beyond all decent contemplation.

During the minute that it takes me to compose this sentence, thousands of children are being abandoned and with many others are running for their lives, whimpering with fear.

Others are slowly being devoured from within by rasping parasites and diseases, thousands of all kinds are dying of starvation, thirst, and disease spawned in the Landfill.

And yet others are being enslaved and abused.

It must be so. Every time there is plenty, There is poverty.

This very fact will automatically lead to an increase in the urban population and “naturally” will increase the poor population and the “natural” state of starvation and misery continues.

In a universe of social media and selfish genes, blind physical forces and social divisiveness, some people are going to get hurt, other people are going to get lucky, and you won't find any rhyme or reason in it, nor any justice. It is the intent of Green Fire to go beyond luck and create a new and better enviroment for them.

The universe of the Children living on Landfills that we observe has precisely the properties we should expect if there is, at bottom, no recognition, no purpose but survival, nothing but pitiless indifference.

Thank you for reading. Don’t be indifferent to this problem, do something, Please!


Mike Prettyman,
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation
For more information come to the website

Children of the Landfill Project

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

http://childrenofthelandfill.earth/

Join our active groups on Markethive

Children of the Landfill
Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

Join the Facebook Group, Children of the Landfill

Donations are taken in Bitcoin: 1HBUKMz77xtRh1vNzFAtnJ488NoYde15o5


 

 
Mar 192016
 

Waste Not, Want Not – Solid Waste at the Heart of Sustainable Development March 3, 2016

For the residents of Rosario, Argentina, good solid waste management means more than just a clean city. Rosario’s approach to garbage has improved the economy and environment with, according to the city’s mayor, “a direct impact on what matters most: the quality of life of urban residents.”

“We’ve tried to be one step ahead, taking on the challenge to innovate while looking for solutions,” said Rosario Mayor Monica Fein, “Our introduction of modernized collection services has resulted in a profound change in the city’s landscape. “

A generation ago, many cities around the world didn’t have comprehensive solid waste management programs. Organic waste was feed to animals and packaging waste hardly existed. But today, due to growing populations, rapid urbanization and economic development, managing trash has become one of the most pressing issues facing the planet.

In 2012, the World Bank sounded the alarm in its flagship report “What a Waste”, predicting a 70% increase in urban garbage by the year 2025. That same year, the critically acclaimed documentary “Trashed” gave viewers an in-depth look at the scope of the global garbage crisis.

Trashed (Trailer) – Environmental Documentary Jeremy Irons Narrates 2:06

“Trashed” is a provocative investigation of one of the fastest growing industries in North America. The garbage business. The film examines a fundamental element of modern American culture…the disposal of what our society defines as “waste.” It is an issue influenced by every American, most of whom never consider the consequences. Nor, it seems, the implications to our biosphere. At times humorous, but deeply poignant, “Trashed” examines the American waste stream fast approaching a half billion tons annually.

What are the effects all this waste will have on already strained natural resources? Why is so much of it produced? While every American creates almost 5 pounds of it every day, who is affected most? And who wants America to make more?

The film analyzes the causes and effects of the seemingly innocuous act of “taking out the garbage” while showcasing the individuals, activists,corporate and advocacy groups working to affect change and reform the current model. “Trashed” is an informative and thought-provoking film everyone interested in the future of sustainability should see.

 

Cities at the center

Since the responsibility for solid waste management usually falls on the shoulders of municipalities, it’s no surprise that the issue tops the agenda of mayors in rich and poor countries alike, according to Ede Illjasz-Vasquez, Senior Director for the World Bank’s Social, Urban, Rural and Resilience Global Practice.

“Without good solid waste management, you can’t build a sustainable and livable city,” he said. “It’s not just about technical solutions. There are climatehealth, andsafety impacts, as well as important social considerations, from the inclusion of waste pickers to changing behavior so people and societies are encouraged to reduce and recycle waste. ”

Read full story: http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2016/03/03/waste-not-want-not—solid-waste-at-the-heart-of-sustainable-development.print

 

Note: Just in case you may have missed any of my previous blog posts, I post here on one of my active projects. It is a new social network for entrepreneurs, completely free, and very unique. It could be a great thing for your business. It is called MarketHive. Just click —-> HERE <—- to find out more.

If you are interested in participating in this effort to lift these children to inspiration, please join me in the Markethive group “Green Fire”. It is from here that we will start a crowd funding campaign to aid Green Fire in its mission – The Children of the Landfill.

 

Mar 152016
 

Ask yourself this question, have we done enough?

If you listen to this now 24 year old talk given in 1992 then listen to the 2nd video in the linked article you will understand the motivation of Green Fire Engineered Reclamation to assist the Children of the Landfill.

~

“I’m only a child, yet I know that we’re all in this together and should act as one single world towards one single goal.” –12-year-old Severn Cullis-Suzuki speaking at the 1992 UN Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro.

 Hello, I’m Severn Suzuki speaking for E.C.O. – The Environmental Children’s Organisation. We are a group of twelve and thirteen-year-olds from Canada trying to make a difference: Vanessa Suttie, Morgan Geisler, Michelle Quigg and me. We raised all the money ourselves to come six thousand miles to tell you adults you must change your ways. Coming here today, I have no hidden agenda. I am fighting for my future.

    Losing my future is not like losing an election or a few points on the stock market. I am here to speak for all generations to come. I am here to speak on behalf of the starving children around the world whose cries go unheard. I am here to speak for the countless animals dying across this planet because they have nowhere left to go. We cannot afford to not be heard.

    I am afraid to go out in the sun now because of the holes in the ozone. I am afraid to breathe the air because I don’t know what chemicals are in it. I used to go fishing in Vancouver with my dad until just a few years ago we found the fish full of cancers. And now we hear about animals and plants going extinct every day – vanishing forever. In my life, I have dreamt of seeing the great herds of wild animals, jungles and rainforests full of birds and butterflies, but now I wonder if they will even exist for my children to see. Did you have to worry about these little things when you were my age? All this is happening before our eyes and yet we act as if we have all the time we want and all the solutions. I’m only a child and I don’t have all the solutions, but I want you to realise, neither do you!

    You don’t know how to fix the holes in our ozone layer. You don’t know how to bring salmon back up a dead stream. You don’t know how to bring back an animal now extinct. And you can’t bring back forests that once grew where there is now desert. If you don’t know how to fix it, please stop breaking it!

    Here, you may be delegates of your governments, business people, organisers, reporters or politicians – but really you are mothers and fathers, brothers and sister, aunts and uncles – and all of you are somebody’s child. I’m only a child yet I know we are all part of a family, five billion strong, in fact, 30 million species strong and we all share the same air, water and soil – borders and governments will never change that. I’m only a child yet I know we are all in this together and should act as one single world towards one single goal. In my anger, I am not blind, and in my fear, I am not afraid of telling the world how I feel.

    In my country, we make so much waste, we buy and throw away, buy and throw away, buy and throw away, and yet northern countries will not share with the needy. Even when we have more than enough, we are afraid to share, we are afraid to let go of some of our wealth. In Canada, we live the privileged life, with plenty of food, water and shelter – we have watches, bicycles, computers and television sets. The list could go on for two days.

    Two days ago here in Brazil, we were shocked when we spent some time with some children living on the streets. And this is what one child told us: “I wish I was rich and if I were, I would give all the street children food, clothes, medicine, shelter and love and affection.” If a child on the street who has nothing, is willing to share, why are we who have everything still so greedy?

    I can’t stop thinking that these children are my age, that it makes a tremendous difference where you are born, that I could be one of those children living in the Favelas of Rio; I could be a child starving in Somalia; a victim of war in the Middle East or a beggar in India. I’m only a child yet I know if all the money spent on war was spent on ending poverty and finding environmental answers, what a wonderful place this earth would be!

    At school, even in kindergarten, you teach us how to behave in the world. You teach us: not to fight with others, to work things out, to respect others, to clean up our mess, not to hurt other creatures to share – not be greedy. Then why do you go out and do the things you tell us not to do? Do not forget why you’re attending these conferences, who you’re doing this for – we are your own children. You are deciding what kind of world we are growing up in. Parents should be able to comfort their children by saying “everything’s going to be alright’, “we’re doing the best we can” and “it’s not the end of the world”.

    But I don’t think you can say that to us anymore. Are we even on your list of priorities? My father always says “You are what you do, not what you say.” Well, what you do makes me cry at night. You grown ups say you love us. I challenge you, please make your actions reflect your words. Thank you for listening.

Mar 042016
 

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation salutes Globarec for its contributions to the welfare of more than 20 million people engaged in recycling in the world.

Green Fire is here to make it better.

This hugh work force is mostly invisible but they are there all the time picking up after us.

The Global Alliance of Waste Pickers is a networking process supported by WIEGO, among thousands of waste picker organizations with groups in more than 28 countries covering mainly Latin America, Asia and Africa.

From the Globalrec.com newsletter.

Today, March 1, we commemorate International Waste Pickers’ Day in remembrance of our compañeros who were brutally assassinated in the Universidad Libre de Barranquilla (Colombia) in 1992. That terrible day, waste pickers were tricked by personnel from the Universidad Libre de Barranquilla, who invited them to enter into the premises of the university under the pretense of providing them with recyclable materials. Once inside they were beaten and shot to death so that their bodies could be used for research and organ trafficking. The tragedy was denounced by a survivor, who during the attack pretended to be dead and later escaped.

According to the ILO, there are more than 20 million people engaged in recycling in the world. In each country our sector has unique story.

We are on the lookout for legislative changes that are taking place in several parts of the world attempting to leave the management of recycling in the hands of private companies, excluding waste pickers and their organizations. This is the case in Turkey where the Environmental Law whereby the purchase of materials from waste pickers is not legal was approved. This affects 500,000 people that make a living by picking waste.

Let’s commemorate this day by raising the flags of the cartoneros in favor of the recognition of our profession and work conditions, just as any other worker (minimum wage, social rights, social and health protection, and recognition of our organizations as legitimate).

¡Si tocan a uno nos tocan a todos!

Colombia, USA, France, Ecuador, Uruguay, Argentina.

Federación Argentina de Cartoneros y Recicladores (FACyR) – Argentina
ARB – Asociación de Recicladores de Bogotá – Colombia.
RENARC – Red Nacional de Recicladores del Ecuador – Ecuador.
Sure We Can – USA.
Association AMELIOR – France.
UCRUS – Unión de Clasificadores de Residuos Urbanos Sólidos – Uruguay.