Apr 252017
 

Greenfire brings ways to clean the pullotants out of these landfills for the benefit of these acavengers. Thier nomadic lives have found a continuation of the poor lifestyle. Greenfire can turn the poverty into prosparity.  http://greenfirefunding.com/ 

Sanitation workers and scavengers pick their way through the refuse of the landfill in the Payatas district of Quezon City, Metro Manila. (Photo by Akira Kodaka)

MANILA — What is it like living at the foot of a mountain of garbage?

The Payatas district in Quezon City, Metro Manila, has been called the city's "second Smokey Mountain" — a huge mound of refuse from which many scavengers scrape out a meager income.

Payatas is about a 40-minute drive from central Manila. There, on a spring day, a long column of garbage-laden trucks heads for the dump, billowing up dust. A foul smell is on the breeze.

A nearby hill gives a bird's-eye view of the dump. With a long camera lens one can get a clear look at the top of the massive garbage heap. As the trucks unload, sanitation workers and scavengers scramble.

The scavengers eke out a living collecting and selling metal and plastic scrap to dealers. In the Payatas district, they earn between 100 pesos and 300 pesos ($2 to $6) a day. It is less than the minimum wage, but better than nothing.

Smokey Mountain was the nickname of a large, smoldering landfill located in Manila's Tondo district. After it was shut down in 1995, many of the scavengers who lived there moved to Payatas. The community that arose became known as the second Smokey Mountain, though on this day there was no smoke visible.

Order amid chaos

The Quezon municipal government manages the Payatas landfill. There is a checkpoint at the entrance, through which only registered waste disposal workers and scavengers are allowed to enter.

The scavengers are divided into two groups of 400-500 people each, with the first group allowed to enter in the morning and the second in the afternoon. The dump is supposed to be off limits to children 15 years old or younger.

The entry restrictions were introduced in response to a landslide at the dump in 2000 that left about 300 people dead or missing.

 

 

But the landfill is expected to reach its capacity in a year or two. It is anyone's guess what will become of the community then.

These days, recycling garbage is not the only business in the area. Some people are making handicrafts such as stuffed animals with the help of a nonprofit organization, for example.

The Philippine economy continues to grow, but it will take time for the fruits of development to spread to impoverished areas like Payatas. People living at the foot of the garbage mountain will no doubt keep getting by as best they can, hoping for something better.

Source: Payatas scavengers living on Manila’s waste

Apr 112017
 

Land Department and MPKj officers visiting the former forest reserve of Bukit Enggang in Bandar Sungai Long. The site is being used to illegally dump rubbish and carry out open burning activities. — SAMUEL ONG/The Star

Land Department and MPKj officers visiting the former forest reserve of Bukit Enggang in Bandar Sungai Long. The site is being used to illegally dump rubbish and carry out open burning activities. — SAMUEL ONG/The Star

ILLEGAL rubbish dumping and open burning at the former forest reserve of Bukit Enggang in Bandar Sungai Long are posing serious health problems for residents.

Over the past 10 years, there have been about 10 illegal rubbish dumps in Bukit Enggang. The residents claimed this had made them fall sick and their children were coughing badly after inhaling smoke from the open burning.

The illegal dumping problem has not been resolved despite residents’ many complaints and actions by the Kajang Municipal Council (MPKj).

Sungai Long resident Yong Yew Hong, 53, who lived there for more than three years, said he jogged in Bukit Enggang every day.

“At midnight every day a few rubbish and sand trucks filled with rubbish enter Bukit Enggang and come out empty,” said Yong when visiting the rubbish dump at Bukit Enggang.

“There are about 10 rubbish dumps in the housing areas near Bukit Enggang where residents suffer from the foul smell and smoke from the burning of rubbish.

“They start burning the rubbish in the evening every day. This causes the air in the housing area to be hazy.

Another Sungai Long resident Lee Hui Leng, 34, said they were forced to close their windows and doors to keep the smoke out.

“When my husband and I drove past the area one night, we noticed the people burning the rubbish with kerosene,” said Lee.

Jogger Benny Ong, 74, said he had been exercising and jogging at Bukit Enggang for about 20 years.

“Now Bukit Enggang is famous for illegal dumping. The foul smell and smoke from the rubbish dumps have kept joggers away.

“There are food waste, broken furniture, development waste and many more at the rubbish dumps,” said Ong.

Kajang Municipal councillor Lai Wai Chong said MPKj received 52 complaints from the residents in February and confiscated 12 vehicles.

“Each offender was fined RM2,000 and their vehicles confiscated for a month.

“We will return the vehicles to the offenders only after they pay up the fine,” he said, adding that the council would keep a 24-hour watch over the area to catch the culprits red-handed.

Source: Open burning at illegal rubbish dumps a health risk for Bukit Enggang folk – Community | The Star Online

Apr 032017
 

INDONESIA: The Methane Gas Canteen is an eatery like no other – it’s situated right in the middle of the Jatibarang Landfill in Semarang, Central Java, surrounded by mounds of putrefying waste, household rubbish, broken glass and plastic.

Every day, while men, women and children dig through mountains of trash collecting plastic and glass bottles to sell, husband and wife team Sarimin and Suyatmi are busy cooking.

Their customers? Cash-strapped scavengers who have the option to pay for their meals with plastic waste instead of money – part of the community’s novel solution to recycle the non-degradable plastic and reduce waste in the landfill.

Mr Sarimin, 56, weighs the amount of plastic each customer brings to the diner and calculates how much it is worth. This value is then deducted from the cost of the meal, or any surplus value refunded to the customer.

“I think we recycle 1 tonne of plastic waste a day, which is a lot. This way, the plastic waste doesn’t pile up, drift down the river and cause flooding.

“This doesn’t only benefit the scavengers, it benefits everyone,” said Mr Sarimin.

WATCH: How this works (2:08)

 

 

 

 

Source: Diner in the landfill lets patrons pay for lunch with plastic waste – Channel NewsAsia

Mar 132017
 

There are now nearly 6 million Syrian children suffering from the perils of war, including hundreds who were killed, maimed or recruited to fight in 2016, the worst year on record for Syrian children, a UN watchdog has said.

“The depth of suffering is unprecedented. Millions of children in Syria come under attack on a daily basis, their lives turned upside down,”said Geert Cappelaere, UNICEF regional director for the Middle East and North Africa, speaking from Homs, Syria. “Each and every child is scarred for life with horrific consequences on their health, well-being and future.” 

'Growing up with war': Children of Syria share heartbreaking stories of death, fear & survival

 

 

 

At least 652 children died last year, and 255 of them were killed in or near their schools, the UNICEF report said. That signals a 20 percent increase on the number killed during 2015. 

“A father in Aleppo lives with the trauma of letting his daughters go to school,” Cappelaere said, retelling one of the many heart-breaking stories from the conflict. “They left their makeshift home one morning with their schoolbags on their backs. Only their lifeless bodies returned after a shell slammed into their classroom.”

UNICEF also believes more than 850 children were recruited to take part in hostilities – double the number in 2015 – and were used as executioners, suicide bombers or prison guards.

While horrifying, the number pales in comparison to the 5.8 million Syrian children who are dependent on humanitarian assistance – a twelvefold increase from 2012, the organization said.

“Beyond the bombs, bullets and explosions, children are dying in silence often from diseases that can otherwise be easily prevented. Access to medical care, lifesaving supplies and other basic services remains difficult,” the report added.

Almost half of those in need were displaced, many of them up to seven times, and over 2.3 million children are now living as refugees in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt and Iraq.

Child refugees living in relative safety in neighboring countries are still deprived of some basic needs, unable to go to school and forced to beg or do low-paying jobs to make the ends meet, the UNICEF report said.

Unsurprisingly, many children took life-threatening journeys on the so called ‘death boats’ crossing the Mediterranean to reach Europe.

Inside Syria, 2.8 million children are living in hard-to-reach areas, including 280,000 living literally on the battlefield, almost completely cut off from humanitarian aid.

As the country’s welfare system shrinks, families “are taking extreme measures just to survive, often pushing children into early marriage and child labor,” the report said. “In more than two thirds of households, children are working to support their families, some in extremely harsh conditions unfit even for adults.”

“I don’t know how to read or write. I only know how to draw the sky, the sea and the sun. I’ve waited tables, I served beans, corn, hummus, water pipe, potatoes, seeds. I’ve cleaned the shop and served ice cream to children,” said Fares, a six-year-old Syrian boy now living in Lebanon.

READ MORE: ‘They don’t want to be refugees’: RT sees Syria’s children surviving through war

With the Syrian war about to enter its sixth year, more and more people have become food-insecure. Inadequate food as a result of the protracted violence leads to poor nutrition among children and is weakening their immune system, UNICEF said, stressing that even ordinary diseases are now fatal.

“The situation for Syrian children has hit rock bottom,” said Juliette Touma, UNICEF’s regional spokesperson.

“The past year has been the worst since the crisis began, with children pushed right to the brink – being recruited at an ever younger age, being used to man checkpoints, being trained to use weapons, serving as prison guards. We also have reports of sexual abuse of girls by underage children, so it’s very grim.”

 

Source: ‘Dying in silence’: Suffering of Syrian children at its worst, millions under attack, says UNICEF — RT News

Mar 022017
 

This story depicts the conditions of global waste, the most dangerous invisible threat to mankind that exists.

Millions can be lifted out of poverty without ruining the planet with the help of clean sustainable energy.

Practical Action (formerly ITDG),

Power to the People, 2002



What Is It About Waste?

Is It Waste Or Is It Waste?

Waste, Just look at it. It’s the stuff we put in the little plastic bag lining the kitchen “garbage can”, then take to the big black garbage can container out at the curb. Listen, subconsciously for the sound of the garbage truck then again subconsciously sigh when we hear the dumping and the truck driving to the next garbage container.

Most of the people fail to see it at all – the eye tends to subtract it – but those who do notice usually don’t pay any attention. It’s “Out sight out of mind.”

According to the United Nation. ‘Wastes’ are substance or objects, which are disposed of or are intended to be disposed of or are required to be disposed of by the provisions of national law.

In the modern language of garbage “Waste”, has become synonymous with “Trash” – that is, waste has come to mean the perceived dirty, icky, unhelpful, useless, valueless material that’s left over when we’re done with something. By this definition, waste is the foul stuff we wish would just disappear.

Out of Sight, Out of Mind”

Our entire elaborate waste collection, transportation and disposal system has for a century been built around this “just make it go away” concept, An illusion for which Americans happily (or at least regularly) pay either through taxes or monthly bills. Waste in this sort of discussion is always to be defined as a cost, a negative and a burden – an inevitable, unpleasant fact of life, for which the only remedy is removal.

I apply a different definition to the word “Waste”, the one we at Green Fire emphasize – the original verb form of the word as in ‘to waste” something. By this definition the nature of the discussion changes, because “to waste” implies the object being wasted has value, be it time, resources or manpower. After all, you can’t “Waste” something that has no value.

The intro to WALL-E displays an image of a post-apocalyptic Earth. An image that in today’s world grows millions of tons every day. An image of the Earth that may be. An image of the earth we wasted.

Description from the trailer:

The intro to WALL-E combines an image of a post-apocalyptic Earth with the post-war vocals of “Hello Dolly.” It connects the post-apocalypse to the aesthetics of the 50s (“Hello Dolly” is actually from the 60s, but still), the period both of the birth of consumer society and of nuclear paranoia, an image reinforced by the subsequent 50s stylings of the Buy ‘n’ Large outlets we see a bit later. I’m intrigued as to why this is the style we still reach to, 60 or so years later, when we want to represent the end of the world.

Wall-E trailer

What follows is not a cartoon, it is today’s reality.

The many posts will introduce you to the world’s waste conditions based on the projections of global organizations and the major organizations envolved and their efforts in this cause.

There is a growing awareness of the fact that surrounding every major population center in the world is a landfill and that almost 2% of the population of the metro area are informal workers and the Landfill Pickers. There are examples and reports from credible resources that are included about the many similar situations around the world.

The Green Fire Engineered Reclamation vision is outlined addressing the major needs of this situation; clean energy, very low cost housing, employment, education, health and Hope For The Future. Our uses of what is reclaimed is purposely designed to provide a safe healthy environment to these workers.

Please continue. This story is told with images and short videos included.

Feb 172017
 

We are GreenFire DAO, an industrial blockchain application for Landfill Mining & Reclamation and its cryptocurrency, the “Gladiator” (GLD), a gold and asset backed global trade token.

Our solution is the creation of a decentralized autonomous organization, the GreenFire DAO to manage this project.

To fund the GreenFire DAO creation, a crypto token, the “Gladiator” (GLD), is issued and may then freely traded, with its value reflecting the productivity of the GreenFire DAO and the constantly increasing gold and cash backing.

The “Gladiator” Token is available HERE , The Gladiator (GLD) is backed 2:1 with assets on deposit.

If you are interested in participating in the reclamtion of global open dumps and help stop the 20% stream of additional global pollution coming form them, then, please buy a Gladiator Token.

For Friends and visitors – a 15 day 50% discount, Go to http://greenfirefunding.com and purchase with this discount code: insidethedao